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Fiction – The Pleasance Dome – Edinburgh

Writer: Glen Neath

Director: David Rosenberg

Reviewer: Jaclyn Martin

Prepare to enter a world where your sense of sight is removed and your world is experienced entirely through sound and, occasionally, touch.

Upon entering the auditorium you are assigned a set of numbered headphones and must find the corresponding seat. This in itself feels a little unnerving, the eyes of those already seated peer at you while you try to figure out the numbering system.

As the show begins, a few slides of a hotel room are shown on a projector for context but then the auditorium is plunged into a thick, impenetrable darkness. From here on out, it is all down to the audience and its “collective imagination”.

You know that dream where you have to give an imminent presentation that you had no idea you were meant to give? This is the concept from which director David Rosenberg draws his inspiration. We are the main character in this landscape, guided by the voices in the darkness. We embark on a surreal adventure, an experience akin to lucid dreaming due to our wakefulness yet deprived sense of sight.

Glen Neath’s script manages to capture the confusing, elusive nature of the ‘dream’ plot-line and the haphazard to-ing and fro-ing of scenes within that world. One minute we are wandering the corridors of the hotel, the next racing along in a car, the tremors actually felt beneath our feet.

Part play, part psychological experiment, this is not for those of a nervous disposition (and definitely not for those afraid of the dark). This is, however, a unique and interesting concept, completely different from everything else on the Fringe.

Runs until 30th August 2015

Writer: Glen Neath Director: David Rosenberg Reviewer: Jaclyn Martin Prepare to enter a world where your sense of sight is removed and your world is experienced entirely through sound and, occasionally, touch. Upon entering the auditorium you are assigned a set of numbered headphones and must find the corresponding seat. This in itself feels a little unnerving, the eyes of those already seated peer at you while you try to figure out the numbering system. As the show begins, a few slides of a hotel room are shown on a projector for context but then the auditorium is plunged into…

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The Reviews Hub - Scotland
The Scotland team is under the editorship of Lauren Humphreys. The Reviews Hub was set up in 2007. We aim to review all professional types of theatre, whether that be Commercial, Repertory or Fringe as well as Comedy, Music, Gigs etc.