Home / Edinburgh Festival Fringe / Blind Man’s Song – Pleasance Dome, Edinburgh

Blind Man’s Song – Pleasance Dome, Edinburgh

Director: Guillaume Pigé

Reviewer: Sara Jackson

An intriguing piece, with the mark of a company building themselves with growing confidence, Blind Man’s Song follows the titular sightless musician (played by Alex Judd, who also composed the music) on a journey through memory and imagination, as two faceless figures – a woman in green and a man in red – explore space and time. Judd’s musicianship is first-rate, his skill equal on piano and violin, and his use of electronic loops and processes allows him to create soundscapes as complex as an experienced band, even while his anonymous figures whirl his piano around and toy with him. Whether acoustic deliberation or happy accident, the space itself resonates perfectly with his harmonic experiments, and the whole piece has the organically tight feel of a project conceived among collaborators intimately familiar with one another.

Unfortunately, this has perhaps led it to be a little too opaque, and it times it seems it falls between two stools – neither abstract enough to be purely impressionist, nor cohesive enough to be truly narrative. There seemed to be a storyline, but it was half-glimpsed and remained unformed – the effort of trying to tease meaning from the excellently precise and inventive work by Selma Roth and Guillaume Pigé (who also directed) kept pulling one away from enjoying the show as much as it might have been enjoyed. Perhaps the familiarity of collaborative composition obscured from the company how a first-time audience might see it. However, overall an accomplished and assured performance.

Blind Man’s Song runs at Summerhall until August 30th 2015

 

Director: Guillaume Pigé Reviewer: Sara Jackson An intriguing piece, with the mark of a company building themselves with growing confidence, Blind Man’s Song follows the titular sightless musician (played by Alex Judd, who also composed the music) on a journey through memory and imagination, as two faceless figures – a woman in green and a man in red – explore space and time. Judd’s musicianship is first-rate, his skill equal on piano and violin, and his use of electronic loops and processes allows him to create soundscapes as complex as an experienced band, even while his anonymous figures whirl his…

Review Overview

The Public Reviews Score

An accomplished and assured performance

About The Reviews Hub - Scotland

The Reviews Hub - Scotland
The Scotland team is under the editorship of Lauren Humphreys. The Reviews Hub was set up in 2007. We aim to review all professional types of theatre, whether that be Commercial, Repertory or Fringe as well as Comedy, Music, Gigs etc.